Commensality – The Social Practice of Eating Together

Commensality is the social practice of eating together. It is often used to describe the ritual of sharing food and drink with others, either as a sign of hospitality or as a gesture of friendship.

Relations of Commensality

There are different relations of commensality, depending on who is eating with whom.

In-group commensality refers to the practice of eating with people who are part of the same social group, such as family, friends, or colleagues.

Out-group commensality, on the other hand, is when people from different social groups share a meal. This can be a way of breaking down barriers and promoting understanding between different groups.

The Cultural Meanings of Commensality

Commensality can be found in all kinds of cultures, and it has been an important part of human life for centuries. It can serve a variety of purposes, such as reinforcing social bonds, cementing relationships, or displaying status.

It is also a way for people to come together and share their culture. By eating the same food and sharing the same rituals, they are able to experience each other’s traditions and customs. This can help to build understanding and promote cross-cultural dialogue.

Related Terms:

In-group commensality: The practice of eating with people who are part of the same social group, such as family, friends, or colleagues.

Out-group commensality: When people from different social groups share a meal.

Hospitality: The act of welcoming guests into one’s home and providing them with food and drink.

Social Bonding: The process of forming strong social relationships with others.

Cultural Transmission: The process by which culture is passed from one generation to the next.

Glossary Terms starting with C

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