Anthropology of the City – The Study of Urban Spaces and Culture

Anthropology of the City is the study of how people use and create space in cities, and how cities affect people’s lives. It looks at the way that cities are built, and how people adapt to urban life.

It also examines the way that cities are changing, as more and more people move into them, and how this is affecting the way that people live. Finally, it looks at the ways that cities are used as a site for cultural production, with people creating art, music, and other forms of culture in urban spaces.

The study of cities has long been of interest to anthropologists. Various forms of cities have been studied and compared, from the ancient cities of Mesopotamia to the modern megacities of Asia and Africa.

The Evolution of Anthropology of the City

In the early days of anthropology, scholars such as Robert Redfield looked at cities as part of the Folk-Urban continuum, a model that saw cities as places where folk traditions were being gradually replaced by urban ways of life.

In the 1970s, anthropologists such as Marc Augé began to look at cities as unique places, with their own cultures and customs. This new approach to the study of cities is known as the New Urban Anthropology. It is interdisciplinary, drawing on methods and theories from anthropology, sociology, geography, architecture, and planning.

This research has become an increasingly important field, as more and more people live in urban areas. The study of cities is now seen as a vital part of understanding the human condition.

Related Terms:

New Urban Anthropology: A approach to the study of cities that sees them as unique places, with their own cultures and customs.

Folk-Urban Continuum: A model that saw cities as places where folk traditions were being gradually replaced by urban ways of life.

Glossary Terms starting with C

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